Is this for real...

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  • Updated 7 years ago
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John Larson

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Posted 7 years ago

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Joyce Andersen

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apparently photoshopping is allowed...so long as it looks 'real'. leaves the door wide open I think.
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Jasenka, Official Rep

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Well, to me it looks real... but unlikely.. I had leopard geckos and they couldn't stand anything on their head... I really don't know about this species of lizard how temperamental are they.
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Terry Gower

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Wouldn't it eat the snail?
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John Larson

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Terry, I suppose one could make a case that the slimeyness and suction of the snail's body prohibits the gecko from shaking off the little critter. Plus, I don't think geckos are really into escargot.
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Jasenka, Official Rep

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I used to feed mine geckos with snails, but they need to be really small and the shell must not be hard.
On this photo, this is too big snail to be eaten by this lizard...
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John Larson

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I know that post processing is allowed, I was just questioning the "realness" of the snail on the gecko's head. Is this something you would ever actually find in nature? If he did add the snail he did an excellent job, so the question becomes, if you've done a seamless job of post processing does that outweigh the believability factor?
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John Larson

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I was going to comment on the snail's size as well, Jasenka, and that's a very valid point. I would probably guess that most, who don't know the eating habits of a gecko, will find the image believeable, but it would still be helpful to have an answer to the question I posted above.
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Jasenka, Official Rep

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Well considering that snails, if you lift them and put them somewhere else tend to get in their shell and go out when they feel confortable, if this is real and person puts snail on lizards head it would take some time for snail to be fully out of his shell like in the photo. The lizard would have to be very still so snail can feel confortable. Lizards usually don't put up with somthing on them (I used to tease mine putting worm on them and they would react quickly to get it off, even when they were sunbathing).

Other posibility is that snail on itself crawled on lizards head and I, again, dont find likely that lizard would be still and alow snail to crawl on his head.

But this is all my opinion based on leopard geckos. I don't know the species of this lizard and how calm he can (or can not) be, and what he allows.

I can not say if this is real photo or the snail has been PS-ed onto lizard, but I would like to know too :)
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Nikola Vlahov

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I think it might be real. You can meet a lot of strange things in nature. I saw a tiny fly that has been resting on the butterfly antennae. Actually, I have it photographed.
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Darrell Raw

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I would say the lizard is being held by the back legs or tail, hence the open mouth and forward gripping arms. Normally these lizards would grip to the sides of the perch, not the front. If being held, you could put what you wanted to on it's head, it would be too focused on the "threat" of being restrained to bother with shaking it off. My basilisk does a similar threat display when held during cage cleaning, he also allows food to walk all over his head when he's feeling threatened by movement outside the vivarium, he tends to sit with mouth open just like that. I always put crickets and locusts on the branch in front of him during feeding, and they often get on his head and body - he doesn't budge until I've moved away and he feels safe. At that point it's tickets for any bug still within reach...
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Sherry Andreason

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That makes sense, my only other thought would be if the lizard was cold, not sure about this species but most reptiles are slow to respond when cold, that doesn't explain the open mouth display as well as your thoughts do Darrell.

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