Found these articles about a disqualified winning photo because of photoshop in landscape photography- very interesting

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Shooting America

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Posted 6 years ago

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Vibeke

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All very interesting, but Pixoto states;

In an effort to find the best, and most striking imagery, extensive use of Photoshop or other post processing techniques is allowed in all categories. However images that look like “digital art” rather than photography should be categorized as such.

The site I belonged to be for Pixoto, allowed no additions or deletions, no vignettes or borders, probably too restrictive, while Pixoto is too generous. Hard to find the perfect mixture.

Perhaps we should start a poll of what we like least about the site and to not be to negative and other list of what we like most.
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redwar

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Yeah, its pretty had not to notice that the upside down boats have highlights starting from the photographer's POV but the sun is going down opposite of the POV.

But made me laugh is the third link where the shading blocks up at 180 degrees opposite of the light source and yet the same angle for the back of the big building has details that couldn't happen either.

British proper I suppose.
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Lenore

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This is one of my absolute favourite articles -- worth reading, in my opinion, from the first word to the last (it's not long). It makes excellent points. Especially the last paragraph :-)

http://jerrybuley.com/Truth-Beauty&fi...
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Bridgette Rodriguez

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And? Pixoto has already made up its mind to accept photoshopped and excessively processed/altered photos, period. And those photos are usually the ones that are at the very top of the Leaderboard in the different categories, including Landscape.

FYI, in one of my previous suggestions I made about forming a different category for minimally processed photos, I noted how the very well RESPECTED National Geographic does NOT allow HDR and excessively processed photos in their photo contests (for the public).
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Tim Hall

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Not defending either side, but this guy was disqualified for braking the rules, which seem to be...enhancing photos is okay, but altering the photos is not. Just their site's rules, Pixoto makes their own rules, it's their site...so be it either way in my opinion.

(Favorite rant warning)...The writer of the article shows his ignorance by citing the work of Ansel Adams as evidence against the legitimacy of modern day photoshopping...What irks me to no end is the fact that none of Ansel Adam's work was realistically reproduced...I have studied Mr. Adams work for some years...He said in a BBC interview when asked about this very subject...he says, with a wry smile , "Oh, none of my images are realistic". Yep, straight from the Yosemite horse's mouth..."None of my images are realistic". He goes on to say that none of the light and shadow values he is so famous for are realistic either, and his prints were so "unrealistic" that he said they were, "very hard to reproduce", they all came about in the post processing, and he cites the fact that were printed on silver coated print paper to give them the "chrome effect" he is so famous for.

The interviewer then asks Ansel why he thought his work needed such enhancements and Mr Adams said if he had to use his images straight from the camera, "The world would look like an ugly place!": Then he shows three different post processed enhancements of the same photo...all different, which I believe was "Sunset Moonrise".

I found the Library of Congress Online Collections has a number of Ansel's glass plate negatives he donated, and prints are presented straight from his camera without the benefit of Ansel's post processing, and the poor quality of his original unedited and un-enhanced work is shocking.

If anyone wants to give evidence against the legitimacy of post camera enhancing then they need to quit using Ansel Adams as an example of pure or natural or real photography because Ansel said it best himself, "None of my images are realistic".

(The entire interview is available on youtube).
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Lenore

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Tim, well said.

Did you read the article I linked to, above? Ansel Adams is mentioned in it.
:-)

And your very point about people pointing to Ansel Adams as one of the great examples of "no enhancements" is one I've made many times myself. It's one of my pet peeves :-)

My other pet peeve is when people casually throw out the term "HDR" without knowing what the heck they're talking about. I bet most of the people who use the term could neither explain what the acronym stands for or how to set up the multiple shots needed to create the final image. It's shocking how many people point to a photograph and say, "that's HDR and I don't like it" when the photo isn't HDR at all.

Off of soapbox now............
:-)
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Tim Hall

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Thank you so much for the link, Lenore! I had not seen your post before I added mine. Glad someone else is irked by those who praise Ansel Adams as a "real" photographer because they think he never used post-processing in his work...Ha ha..I guess some folks who argue against post processing can't cope with the fact that the greatest landscape photographer in US history virtually invented post processing, and cited it as his most important photography tool.

I believe it was also Mr. Adams who said, "A great photograph may only take 1/60th of a second behind the camera...but two days in the darkroom". Go Ansel!
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Bridgette Rodriguez

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As a follow-up to my reply, above, about the National Geographic not allowing HDR and excessively processed photos to be qualified for entry into their photo contests (for the public), and as previously provided in another suggestion post I wrote several weeks back, their rules can be read at: http://photography.nationalgeographic...

I particularly love how they say. "...The world is already full of visual artifice, and we don’t want the National Geographic Photo Contest to add to it. We want to see the world through your eyes, not the tools of Photoshop or setup photography..."

YYYEEESSS!
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Pete Bobb

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National Geographic doesn't allow zoo pictures of animals either in the magazine.
I don't know if they allow zoo pics in their photo contests though.
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Lenore

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National Geographic is also certainly not against HDR, since they offer tips and examples of great HDR images:
http://photography.nationalgeographic...

This one particular contest has rules. All contests have rules. Contests will have different rules. We are all free to enter the ones we like and ignore the ones we don't :-)
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Bridgette Rodriguez

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Pete Bobb, you are probably right about zoo photos. They keep it real and I love that.
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Bridgette Rodriguez

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Lenore, all NG photo contests (for public participation) have the same rules about no HDR, etc.
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Quantummist

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If Adams had the ability to use a post processing sofware he would have been all over it....
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Pete Bobb

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I agree. I have a book of Adam's color photos.
He didn't like the lack of control over his color images.
With photoshop, it would have returned the artist's hand back into his work which would have made him happy with the creative process.
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Lenore

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All contests have rules. Contests will have different rules. We are all free to enter the ones we like and ignore the ones we don't :-)

Yes, I just repeated myself.

And Quantummist, I agree with you completely.
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Bridgette Rodriguez

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Lenore, true about all contests have different rules, but, again, all NG's require submissions to not be excessively edited and no HDR. They have not changed.
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Johnny Thomas

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Bridgette, that is why National Geographic is still a respected source for great photography and the fact that they prohibit excessive editing for their photo contests shows that they don't want "visual artifice" to become part of what they are known for and their much-respected world.
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Bridgette Rodriguez

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Lenore, go look at their yearly contests over the last few years and you will see their requirements (NG's).
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Tim Hall

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Bridgette, I agree with you regarding Nat Geo because Nat Geo magazine is first and foremost..."journalism"...Journalism is supposed to be a presentation of the World's reality...of course they wouldn't allow photos to be unreal in their presentation.

Pixoto is an artist's site and makes makes no intention of presenting itself as journalism. Every type of site should be able to make their own rules, Diversity is good!
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Bridgette Rodriguez

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Tim, I would even go further and say, "photojournalism". However, they have been, and I believe still are, known far more for their photography than for journalism. I respect them, and, no, Pixoto is definitely not National Geographic.
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Pete Bobb

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From the article at the first link:
"... further investigation has confirmed that the image chosen as the overall winner is in breach of the rules...and can announce that [SB] is the new winner of this year’s competition..."
Has pixoto ever increased awards (i.e. #2 moving to #1) based on the winner being disqualified, such as for winning #1 Photographer of the Year using stolen photos that are copyright by other photographers?
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Johnny Thomas

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Interesting question.
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Tim Hall

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I play basketball in my friend's driveway, and I shoot pictures on my road trips. I don't think that makes me comparable to Micheal Jordan, or a National Geographic photographer...Why in the world is anyone here trying to compare Pixoto to the National Geographic Society? Good gracious, ya'll, I wish my images were good enough to be featured in Nat Geo magazine.

I just took a picture of my friend's cat, and I should be upset that Pixoto isn't treating the pic like it belongs in a Nat Geo article about mummified Egyptian animals? Nope, it's just a pic of my friend's cat, and thank you Pixoto I can post it on line for free....Really?..this is supposed to be fun. Not world class journalism.

If anyone's photos can stand up to the National Geographic's standards then I am very happy for you, and wish you well n your world travels...Me? I just got a top 5 Pixoto award for that pic of my friend's cat...and I'm real happy about it.
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Lenore

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Bridgette: You keep making claims about National Geographic based on one contest. You said, "....all NG's require submissions to not be excessively edited and no HDR." You used the word "all". You were referring to all the National Geographic contests.

On what do you base this?

I disagree. Completely. Here is why:

1) Since you are so familiar with NG, I'm sure you're aware of their daily competition called "Your Shot". I'm sure you get their emails, as I have done for quite some time. (For those who do not, here's the link: http://yourshot.nationalgeographic.com/ )

2) I posted a link above to NG's Photo Gallery "How to Take HDR Pictures" which presents tips and a selection of HDR photographs that NG deemed good enough to highlight on their web site. Here is the link again so you don't have to scroll up: http://photography.nationalgeographic...

3) Please go to that link and look at the photographs. Please look at the source of each photo. Where did NG get these photographs? From their daily competition, Your Shot. Every single photograph that NG is highlighting here -- each one, HDR -- is from NG's own daily competition, Your Shot.

Every one but the cows.

Their competition. HDR photographs entered. HDR photographs shared, by NG, with the world because they like them so much.

So .... how can it be that National Geographic does not allow HDR images in "all" (your words) competitions when they are posting HDR images that were from their daily competitions? Not only accepting them but thinking them good enough to highlight? How?
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Tim Hall

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Wise, well said, and well documented, Lenore

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