Why has my Jerry Lewis contribution been declined 5 times?

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This is grossly unfair! I have long noticed that IMDb has a saccharine way of scrubbing negative contributions. Life isn't all "rose water" and neither are celebrities'! To date, I have rewritten and resubmitted this below contribution about 5 times (too long to go back in my history: you guys don't provide appropriate search buttons. Memo to TPTB: PROVIDE a search button so we can quickly sift through our history! CTRL+F isn't working on my PC!) and my latest version (here below) hasn't a hint of (goodness forbid) negativity thrown at Lewis. Yet... deleted again.

This is LONG overdue. It's long time to put an end to Francophobia, and I declare it starts with Jerry Lewis!  

You tell me why this doesn't meet guidelines? #191211-063135-205000

His tremendous popularity in France is easily explained by the fact that Lewis was dubbed by Jacques Dynam ---a very talented French comedian. Lewis' lines were not merely translated, they were completely rewritten to suit francophone audiences, and skillfully matched Jerry's lip movements. The result is that what transpired in the France versions of Jerry's films is very different than what American audiences hear. French audiences are indeed laughing at Jacques' delivery and comedic timing. However, the French people have always credited Jerry Lewis for the French-translated humor.

Reason: Does not meet contribution guidelines.

Previously declined:  191201-211031-342000
 Declined (1)NAME TRIVIA ADDITION
His tremendous popularity in France is easily explained by the fact that Lewis was not only dubbed by Jacques Dynam , a very talented French comedian, but Lewis' humor was translated to suit francophone audiences. The result is that what transpired in France broadcasts of Jerry's films is often radically different than what American audiences hear, and simply made to match Jerry's lip movements. French audiences are, as such, laughing at Jacques' delivery and comedic timing, and not Jerry Lewis per se. However, the French people chose to forego all accolades for this French actor---and for the talented script translators---and instead humbly gave credit to Jerry Lewis.


I mean I go out of my way to word it well, it's not like I wrote "yanks are totes right: this dude is a completely unfunny buffoon but we superior French totes rewrote his lame humor so we made the dude funny!" 

What more do you want?? This "myth" has baffled Americans for decades. I give you the answer you've been seeking for ages on a silver platter and for free and yet... DECLINED???? 

UGH! Sacrebleu! IMDb: tu me les casses et j'me casse! 

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Appraiser1

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  • Fed up with IMDb censorship but ending tongue in cheek

Posted 7 months ago

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Elizabeth, Employee

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Hi there, thank you for reaching out. Please know that the trivia item you're entering is too long; we recommend condensing it to under 400 characters and resubmitting to the page. Cheers!
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Appraiser1

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Uh... it's under 400 words.I wrote to explain. I often have longer stuff published. Again, here's the contribution minus my ranting. I'm pretty sure it doesn't add up to 400 words:

His tremendous popularity in France is easily explained by the fact that Lewis was dubbed by Jacques Dynam ---a very talented French comedian. Lewis' lines were not merely translated, they were completely rewritten to suit francophone audiences, and skillfully matched Jerry's lip movements. The result is that what transpired in the France versions of Jerry's films is very different than what American audiences hear. French audiences are indeed laughing at Jacques' delivery and comedic timing. However, the French people have always credited Jerry Lewis for the French-translated humor.
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I've regularly seen longer trivia on IMDb. I'm trying to find some...
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Appraiser1

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And I've found proof at Star Trek: TOS. So I'm pretty sure that trimming won't do a darned thing here. You have a biased fanboy at IMDb and it's time he quits censoring my valid and politely worded contribution!

Check out this monster (in length, I didn't bother to read content & not asking you to. Just to eyeball it for LENGTH) at TRIVIA:
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https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0060028/trivia?ref_=tt_ql_2

In many interviews, Leonard Nimoy recounted the origin of the Vulcan salute, which he introduced into the show. In one such interview (with The A.V. Club in July 2010), he explained, "the gesture that I introduced into Star Trek, the split-fingered Vulcan salute, we'll call it... that came from an experience - I'm going all the way back to my childhood again - when I was about eight years old, sitting in the synagogue at high holiday services with my family. There comes a moment in the ceremony when the congregation is blessed by a group of gentlemen known as Kohanim, members of the priestly tribe of the Hebrews. And the blessing is one that we see in the Old and New Testament: "May the Lord bless you and keep you; may the Lord cause His countenance to shine upon you," and so forth. When they give this blessing, you're told not to look! You're supposed to avert your eyes. I peeked, and I saw these guys with their hands stretched out-there were five or six of them, all with their hands stretched out toward the congregation-in that gesture, that split-fingered gesture. Some time later, I learned that the shape that hand creates is a letter in the Hebrew alphabet, the letter shin, which is the first letter in the word Shaddai, which is the name of the Almighty. So the suggestion is that they're using a symbol of God's name with their hands as they bless the congregation."

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There's even longer. Check out the entry that starts with: "The character of yoo-hoo! RA..."
(Edited)
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Appraiser1

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And here are several lengthy gems from Lewis own Trivia page. Are we clear now, Elizabeth!?!? You Brits are a bunch of francophobes. That's the ONLY invalid reason you have to block my contribution!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!  I'll let you count the characters yourself. Any idiot can eyeball these and see that MY CONTRIBUTION IS MORE BRIEF than these:

During the late 1950s, Lewis' stint on his NBC Burbank color television network series, his studio 2 dressing room was located in the lower basement level of the stage 2 facility. Incidental, this stage originally had been built for the MGM swimming film star Esther Williams; the stage was built with a swimming pool (pit with camera ports). NBC's Studio 2 was adjacent to Studio 4 with both studios sharing a common central corridor. Studio 2 and Studio 4 television show's guest performer's dressing rooms were located on each side of the studio's common center corridor. The each studio's much larger "star dressing rooms" were located in the basement of each stage. During a break between the rehearsal and taping of Lewis' comedy television series, Lewis (age 32) decided to practice his golf swing in his dressing room. Driving the golf balls into the wall-board soundproof walls, the golf ball divot indentations made Jerry's dressing room walls look like Al Capone had cut loose with a Thompson sub-machine gun. Upon completion of the show, the next day, NBC facilities had to replace the dressing room walls and redecorate Jerry Lewis' star dressing room. NBC's generous price paid for a network's featured star's boredom and for a pricey spoiled entertainer.


The films of [Dean Martin]'s and his were reliable financial successes for Paramount, and hugely popular with audiences. In later years, both Lewis and Martin admitted frustration, and were critical of Wallis for his formulaic and trite film choices, restricting them to narrow, repetitive roles. As Martin's roles in their films became less important over time, and Lewis receiving the majority of critical acclaim, the partnership came under strain. Martin's participation became an embarrassment, in 1954, when Look magazine published a publicity photo of the team for the magazine cover but cropped Martin out. The partnership ended with their final nightclub act on July 24, 1956 (the team's 10th anniversary of their debut as a duo). Both Martin and Lewis went on to highly successful solo careers, and neither would comment on the split nor consider a reunion. However, they would occasionally be seen at the same public events.

On his 90th birthday in 2016, The Friars Club hosted a tribute for him. Jokes were told by [Richard Belzer], [Max Alexander] and [Freddie Roman]. Lewis was honored as a comic genius, and Belzer deemed him his "savior". Around 200 people were in attendance for the event, and some pre-taped greetings were played by those who were unable to make it. Fellow comedian [Don Rickles] left a message for Lewis, telling him "to go to bed early". Lewis, who sat off to the side on a dais observing the performance, was seen laughing and crying throughout. He gave the final word, saying, "A performer will be there for you to entertain you and all they want from you is an acknowledgement that they've been there, OK?".
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Ed Jones(XLIX)

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A1.
Those are very old trivia items that were entered into the database long before the 400 character (NOT WORD) limit was instituted.

Looking for examples as to somehow prove that you submission warrants inclusion is not going to work.

Rewrite you trivia item and resubmit or don't.

But PLEASE quit running all over this site and complaining.

It will only result in administrator intervention.

And their kind of intervention in light of your behavior will not be nice.

So please tone down the rhetoric. Thanks.

And like the Borg would say,........"Resistance is Futile"!!!!!!
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Ed Jones(XLIX)

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Oh and if you are wondering....the 400 character limit was instituted so as to STOP overly winded mini-novel sized trivia.
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Appraiser1

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So that's it?? You guys aren't gonna publish this? I guess then I can't be bothered helping further, nor with the new international languages this time. I sure didn't get satisfaction here! 
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bderoes, Champion

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She said 400 characters, not 400 words.
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Appraiser1

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And the Star Trek counts as 400 characters? Please! I don't have a counter and I don't have time for this shit!  That one is probably over 400 words too!

I'm done. PS: IMDb enjoy this contribution, since you CENSOR perfectly valid contributions: #191213-012555-183000

BOOM!
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So mine is too long but this is perfectly fine?? FUCKING HELL!

The character of Uhura was one of the first black regular characters on any series (predating Diahann Carroll's groundbreaking lead role as a young, widowed nurse and single mother in Julia (1968) by two years), and she was especially significant because her character avoided many of the stereotypes that were common amongst depictions of African Americans on television at the time. Nichelle Nichols, who played Uhura, has said that Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. himself told her how important it was for her to keep playing the role, since it was so rare to see a positive portrayal of a black character on television. During her interview for the documentary Trekkies (1997), Nichols said that she later heard from at least one viewer for whom King's words had been true as a child: when Whoopi Goldberg (who later went on to star in Star Trek: The Next Generation (1987)) first watched Star Trek: The Original Series (1966), she yelled out, "Momma! There's a black lady on TV, and she ain't no maid!" During a 2011 "Storycorps" interview, Carl McNair, brother of Ronald McNair (the second black person in space and one of the seven astronauts who died in the January 28, 1986, Challenger explosion), recalled the impact that watching "Star Trek" had on Ron: "Now, Star Trek showed the future where there were black folk and white folk working together. I just looked at it as science fiction, 'cause that wasn't going to happen, really. But Ronald saw it as science possibility. He came up during a time when there was Neil Armstrong and all of those guys; so how was a colored boy from South Carolina, wearing glasses, never flew a plane, how was he gonna become an astronaut? But Ron was one who didn't accept societal norms as being his norm, you know? That was for other people. And he got to be aboard his own Starship Enterprise." During the 1970s and 1980s, because of her status as the first black person "in space," N.A.S.A. hired Nichols (during the mid 1970s) to help recruit minority and female astronauts to the program. As a result, N.A.S.A. Astronaut Group 8 (selected in January 1978) yielded the astronauts she helped sign including Colonel Guion Bluford (the first African American in space), Dr. Judith A. Resnik (the first Jewish American person in space), and Dr. Ron McNair. Four of the astronauts (Judith Resnik, Ron McNair, Ellison Onizuka, and Francis Richard "Dick" Scobee) recruited from N.A.S.A. Group 8 perished in the Space Shuttle Challenger on January 28, 1986, which was later commemorated during the introduction of Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home (1986).
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Elizabeth, Employee

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Hi Appraiser, please be advised there is a code of conduct that must be abided by when using this site, which includes using appropriate language towards staff and fellow users. 
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Ed Jones(XLIX)

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His tremendous popularity in France is easily explained by the fact that Lewis was dubbed by Jacques Dynam ---a very talented French comedian. Lewis' lines were not merely translated, they were completely rewritten to suit francophone audiences, and skillfully matched Jerry's lip movements. The result is that what transpired in the France versions of Jerry's films is very different than what American audiences hear. French audiences are indeed laughing at Jacques' delivery and comedic timing. However, the French people have always credited Jerry Lewis for the French-translated humor.
This is 2 separate trivia items. If you want the items included, then do as I have done, or do not.

1. His tremendous popularity in France is explained by the fact that Lewis was dubbed by Jacques Dynam, a very talented French comedian.

2.Jacques Dynam, the voice of Lewis in all french dub-over recordings made the very talented American comedian come alive with his masterful lip syncing skills along with his impeccable comic timing.

Or Combined

3. His popularity in France is because of dubbing work by Jacques Dynam, a talented Frenchman, who made Lewis come alive with his great lip syncing skills and impeccable comic timing.

You might actually be able to combine the two by masterfully condensing the two items.
Or are you not up to the task?

Anyway, I find these two items interesting. Others would also.
Are you to deny us the users of the database your excellent items because you will not comply with IMDb's "CURRENT" (not older) guidelines?


(Edited)

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