What was the last film you saw and how would you rate it? Pt. 18

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Thought I'd post this here until I hear we're doing it somewhere else....

Post the name of the latest movie you've seen and your rating out of 10. 
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Sunshine Boys (t0073766) - 7/10 - loved Burns, hated Matthau.
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Jen, Champion

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Posted 3 years ago

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Pencho15

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Purple Rain (1984) - 4/10 - While movies made to highlight musicians are rarely good, I was expecting better from this one since it is more famous and has endured time. But besides the music there is really nothing to see.


The Day of the Triffids (1963) - 8/10 - While special effects are naturally dated, it is quite entertaining and worth watching. Other movie that I watch inspired by a poll.
(Edited)
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NarniaisAwesome

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Dallas: The Early Years  7/10
Pretty good for a prequel; cast very, very well.
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leavey-2

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First Man (2018) - 8/10 - I regret I didn't see Damien Chazelle's latest in a theatre, but even on small screen this movie offers a breathtaking view of the first moon landing in 1969.
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ElMo

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Never got why he didn't wait for July 2019 to release the film, the 50th anniversary would have generated more buzz, just like QT did with his Hollywood film.
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leavey-2

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Exactly. I missed it when it first came out because it passed completely unnoticed.
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ElMo

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It came out the same period than Bohemian Rhapsody and A Star is Born, didn't stand a chance.
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Stephen Atwood

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I don't think that would have made any difference in terms of First Man's pretty pathetic box office.
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Abi

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The Order (TV Series, Season 1) 10/10, Excellent
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Abi

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More that I have seen in my time away from IMDb:

London Fields 7/10 (Director's Cut)

The Silence of The Lambs 8/10 (Rewatch)

Flight 7500 7/10 (Unusual and Different)

Fear Island 10/10 (Love these Slasher Whodunits)

Ant Man & The Wasp 3/10 (Marvel stop making rubbish movies just for money)

Open Grave 5/10 (Largely Disappointing)
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NarniaisAwesome

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Ant-Man: I agree!  :)
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albstein

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It (1990), 8/10. Such good performances, not only by Tim Curry but also the child actors. The time they take and the gradual shift to the "present" time makes you root for the characters much more than in a typical horror movie. However, the ending is a huge letdown.
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dgranger

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I agree with you. But the problem is with how the book was written. It is literally un-filmable. What the book does back and forth between the kids in the past and their adult life in the present. As the book continues, the sections get shorter and shorter and the switching gets faster and faster until the switching gets so fast that two time periods merge into one and form a third hyper reality or fourth dimension where the monster really lives. The monster is telepathic and attacks you that away. To kill him, they have to kill him both physically and mentally. In the book, one of kids had thought his inhaler fluid had tasted like battery acid. When he had sprayed pennywise with it, the monster had thought he was getting sprayed with acid and reacted physically to that mental thought. It was the adults who realized the monster attacked mentally, not the kids. They bit the monster with their minds. See how this is brilliant as a novel but un-filmable as a film?
(Edited)
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Stephen Atwood

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Rewatch of Inception (2010). Can't express how much I adore the score. Still, the best Nolan film ever.  10/10.
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ElMo

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Started the film at 2am just to sleep with the first scenes, finished it right now at 4am, this must be one of the most upsetting, exhausting and emotionally engaging movies I've ever watched... combined with one of the greatest female performances ever, right there with Gena Rowlands for A Woman Under the Influence, Ellen Burstyn in Requiem for a Dream, Giuletta Masina in Nights of Cabiria or Maria Falconetti in The Passion of Joan of Arc.

The film is I WANT TO LIVE! and there wasn't one millisecond where my heart wasn't pulsating with that poor Barbara Graham, a woman full of life but who had the tragic misfortune to trust the worst persons, what an extraordinary performance from Susan Hawyard! But I'm not sure I would want to watch it again... my heart is shattered already.

Highly recommended...
(Edited)
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Peter, Champion

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Girl, 8/10

I found it difficult.
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joe siegel

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Sorry to brother you 7/10
It was certainly a very strange movie, a satire that at times made me feel uncomfortable but sometimes I kept laughing, I expected to see any comedy to spend the afternoon and I found something completely different, I liked it a lot.
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NarniaisAwesome

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RiffTrax LIVE: Octaman: 10/10 stars!  Awesome to see everyone!
(Edited)
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Stephen Atwood

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Another example of monumentally terrible movie making. The acting?! The alleged Mexican accents?!

The 8 limb bipedal monster with only two workable arms?

All was right and glorious in the Riffing Universe!
(Edited)
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NarniaisAwesome

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Yes, it's prime riffing material!  Every joke was spot on.
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Pencho15

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John Wick (2014) - 7/10, Was expecting a little bit more of plot, but it is entertaining.

On the Basis of Sex (2018) - 7/10, the critics in my newspaper said it was boring, but it is good to see an spend a movie day.

The Hunchback of Notre-Dame (1956) - 7/10, Homage to Notre Dame, My DVD was quite bad and it did not show the whole screen.

His Man Friday (2009) - 5/10  Really obscure short film I discovered while making my Robinson Crusoe poll suggestion. You can watch it here if you have 7 minutes to spare
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ElMo

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Funny that it was the day my "Word War Two" poll was picked that I finally saw "La Ciociara" (or Two Women), the film that earned Sophia Loren an Oscar in 1962, I heard many great things about the film, and how her performance was regarded as one of the all-time best and although I was impressed by the film, I didn't expect I would find a tragic connection with my own background. 

And I meant it because your own username evokes your origin (Moroccan-->ElMaruecan) it's hard to believe that it also contributed to an infamous term apparently very well known in Italy: 'Marocchinate', which means... what it means. Telling it would be a kind of spoiler but it's true when you grew up with the idea that the Moroccan soldiers who fought in Italy and then the South of Europe were fierce fighters with a knowledge of the mountains due to their Berber background, the less honorable side came as a shock.

Now, that's a movie that shows how hellish war is... and maybe twice more for women. I don't know who said that war was fought against mothers, but it's even more tragic in a context where women, whether mothers or daughters, was also exposed to the bombs, the guns and the worst outrages.




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Peter, Champion

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And this film also happens to be in today's '60s War Movie poll.
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ElMo

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Yep, some coincidences!

I think I should also take some perspective now that the emotional shock is over... the Moors are portrayed as human beasts in the film, there's no doubt about that, and the point isn't to react defensively because I come from Morocco (after all, even my parents weren't born at the time and not all the Moors did these things). Now, I just see the film as a chronicle of the hardship underwent by many Italians during the war of liberation with a focus on "two women", as the English title suggests.

And De Sica misses no detail: the fascist militia, the civilians who didn't fight nor collaborated, the crowded trains, hiding in mountains, the German presence, first they're cordial and colorful and then intimidating when they're cornered like rabid dogs, the political debates, the intellectual son (a bit overplayed by Belmondo). In its attempt to be as historically relevant as possible, the film cover numerous points but with only beginnings of comprehension, in fact they only create situations so that Sophia Loren can react and demonstrate how great an actress she is.

Loren has the only substantial role in a plot that works like a clothesline to hang every possible war-related situation and she goes from one to another displaying the same raw Roman spontaneity and sexy magnetism until it's sacrificed on the altar of that deserted church. Obviously Loren represents the soul of Italy, raped and devastated, and by being such an eminent figure in the film, she dwarfs everybody else, including her own daughter whose arc is too predictable to be treated with the same level of fascination. We definitely feel sorry for the two but Loren is so sanctified it begs us for an empathy that was granted already and worse, it ruins the "docudrama" effect.

By that I mean that a good symbolism is important but over-dramatization is a double-edged sword.Th film is complex enough to question the Allies' responsibility in civilians' deaths and other material and moral damages, but it is too superficial in the treatment of the answers by reducing it to their emotional illustrations. And maybe it couldn't be anything else because of its greatest asset: Sophia Loren, the glamorous actress with an unglamorous role, like Brigitte Bardot in "The Truth". She starts as a  the only three-dimensional character in the film, a street-smart frivolous woman with principles and a heart of gold, until her soul is shattered at the end and she becomes a sort of Saint, a martyr figure calling for compassion. 

She's great in the film but the real question is "how great is the film without Loren?" The point is that we're far from neo-realistic masterpieces such as "The Bicycle Thieves" or "Shoeshine" where the protagonists were unknown, where they had dreams of their own, where their lives carried symbols ("a bicycle", a "white horse") and we followed them because we could relate to their anonymousness and appropriate a part of their tragedy, because they weren't actors. In "La Ciociora", every scene was a vehicle for Loren's acting talent and it all built up to that horrific moment where she and her daughter are "taken" by the Goumiers.

Maybe the mistake is that the scene works as a culmination of a long build-up while it could have been a tragedy of its own, the central if not the starting point. In "The Bicycle Thief" we see the descent into poverty, in "Shoeshine", we witness the destruction of a friendship, in "La Ciociora", the traumatic effect and the shock are only given a few minutes before the end and that's because the film went in too many useless directions before, as if the point was to make us empathize with Loren's character and her daughter, as if it would have made the climax even more shocking, maybe the film's mistake is that it underestimated the audience and used a star to... once again, beg for an empathy that was granted already.

I'm not saying "La Ciociora" shouldn't have starred Sophia Loren but by casting her, it sort of departed from its initial purpose, instead of being the tragedy of Italians, it became her tragedy, her role... and her Oscar.

(Edited)
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Stephen Atwood

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Sir ElM? Why are you talking about yourself in the third person in your own post above?
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ElMo

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He did? :)
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Peter, Champion

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I went to see an epic, three-hour long film about good and evil, life and death, love and war. With the baddest Nazi supervillain. And as a bonus, a brilliant depiction of artistic vision.

It is WERK OHNE AUTOR, or NEVER LOOK AWAY, 9/10
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NarniaisAwesome

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RiffTrax LIVE! MST3K Reunion, 9/10!  But IS CORN A GRASS???  :D
RiffTrax The Curse of Bigfoot, 10/10!  "It happened 2 million years ago..."  "But enough about the last good Star Wars movie!"
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Stephen Atwood

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A double header for today.
Avengers: Endgame (2019), 9/10.

Rats - Notte di terrore (1984), 1/10000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000
Rifftrax commentary? 10/10. Why couldn't Thanos snap the entire Italian film making industry so this and many Italian exploitation flicks would never bring eye cancer to the world.

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Pencho15

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Avengers: Endgame (2019) - A great finale for the series, but not neccesarily a great film.  8/10
(Edited)
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Ed Jones (XLIX)

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Dream House (2011) Surprised at the low 6.0 rating. I give it a 7.0. Formulatic from beginning to end, but still entertaining.


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NarniaisAwesome

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Dirty Rotten Scoundrels, 1988, 7/10.
Something about the way they made comedies on the late 80's-early/mid 90's is just so fun and warm looking.  And of course, Steve Martin is very talented.
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Stephen Atwood

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Triple Frontier (2019), 8/10.
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leavey-2

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NarniaisAwesome

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RiffTrax: Julie and Jack, 9/10.  James Nyguen does it again!  (Hey, that rhymed!)
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ElMo

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A NIGHT TO REMEMBER (8/10)

A most interesting watch when you have a certain flute melody springing to mind whenever you think of the iconic ship.

James Cameron had done a lot of good in raising a worldwide interest around the fate of the Titanic, but the film was so spectacular and so abundant in CGI effects and iconic imagery (the 'King of the World' line, the sunset scene, the sinking...) that the factual tragedy turned into a Romeo and Juliet with the ship as a backdrop, and so the public conceded all the tears to fictional characters while the Titanic didn't carry one tragic story but hundreds of them. 

To his credit, Cameron allowed a few characters to emerge (no pun intended) from anonymity, one of the most powerful images of the film is the old couple (Isidor and Ida Strauss) hugging each other on the bed as the water is flowing over the cabin, we have a shot at the classy behavior of first-class passengers Guggenheim or Astor (who died as true gentlemen). But the film was still about Leo and Kate, and a necklace that should have been dropped as an idea rather than an object. Cameron made a modern classic for ages, but when it comes to the facts, it's probably as much about the Titanic as Gone With the Wind is about the Civil War, accessory but not central.

So, the best thing about A Night to Remember is that it doesn't have any central character and thank heavens, no romantic lead. We're embarked in the doomed voyage to follow the path of many passengers and witness the bravery of many  and the cowardice of a few. The story of the baker  who  allegedly survived thanks to many shot of whiskey gets a deserved coverage, a much sadder reality is the way the class system prevented many third passengers to realize that the ship was drowning until it was too late, and most lifeboats were gone. The film also adds more layers to the work and attitude of wireless operators, officers and Captain Smith. Finally, it also covers the subplot involving the Carpathia and the Californian... so the film really puts the story in "history".


It also anticipates the narrative format of many disaster movies and set the template that would be later used in The Towering Inferno or Earthquake, with more modest special effects but still effective nonetheless. One would gather that water is easier to handle as fire or falling rocks but the real test of the film is how spectacular the sinking looks and it passes the test remarkably. As the angle of inclination starts to raise, what was previously suggested by rolling tables  became a much rougher reality and the sight of people sliding along or making the big plunge, voluntarily or not, was a real shocking sight.

The thing is that it all happens for the last thirty minutes and the film is pretty peaceful and restrained for the most part of it. It's interesting that the collision with the iceberg didn't invent inspire any hurry or fear, so while the Titanic is slowly sinking, as viewers, we experience the escalation of fear from its early states to frenzy and panic and "everyone for himself", the Cameron version was a non-stop race against the clock with as many action sequences as possible, culminating with the sinking, but in "A Night to Remember", we get a compression of overwhelming feelings in the las thirty minutes  with secondary characters whose demise or survival  are equally intense.

The film has a documentary value as it adds more knowledge about what really happened, thus it shares many interesting similarities with the 1997 blockbuster, among them: the depiction of ship designer Thomas Andrews as a gentleman hero who stayed till the end, didn't make any attempt to save himself and was contemplating his "failure" while staring as the painting, we have the infamous Bruce Ismay shown in more sympathetic light but surrendering to the instinct of conservation at the last minute and avoiding the disapproving look on  officer Murdoch while he orders the lifeboat to be put down... of course, Ismay feels guilt and remorse, and knows what awaits him... we don't judge him as a villain, there's no villain in the film.

And I guess it's for details like these that the story of Titanic fascinate us. We feel sorry for the passengers and somewhat we wonder: what if we were there? How would we behave? Some refused to wear a lifebelt, some to be saved as long as women and children were not. Those were the days where class meant something and men who defended their pedigree had to give it its fullest meaning, when the best way to act is face death with honor and dignity. The dedication of the orchestra is also inspiring beyond any words, music can sooth the soul during the most horrific moments, but maybe their music was simply a way to pay farewell to humanity through one of its most noble inventions.

And again some tried to get in the lifeboat because the prospect of death was simply too terrifying, are we to judge them? A Night to Remember allows these questioning more than its glorious successor, precisely because it's deprived from all the flash and the cinematic tricks and is told in straightforward black and white way, it's a fine companion piece to the 1997 version, or maybe it's the other way around. Anyway, one of the best thing about Cameron's film is that it encouraged many viewers to give this one a try... and prevent it from sinking into oblivion.
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NarniaisAwesome

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Avengers: Endgame: 5/10.  Will write my review soon.
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albstein

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Your review sounds more positive than 5/10 :). I guess Endgame suffers in pacing compared to the first movie, there are stretches of depressing nonactivity.
'Avengers: Endgame' is a fine little movie
I like your understatement, lol.
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albstein

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So yeah, I went to see Avengers: Endgame because the alternatives were horse movies for teenies. 5/10.

Well, it's the biggest movie event the same way the World Cup is the biggest football (soccer) event, it's a statement about quantity but not necessarily quality. It's as if we were the actual fight for the universe, not just a movie about it. There is this sense that we're watching this together with 90% of humanity (while the rest stars in it). And I gotta admit I felt slight goosebumps towards the end, although it has less to do with actually being captivated and more with being taken hostage and getting Stockholm Syndrome. Like it or not, some of these guys have been part of our collective cinematic lives for more than a decade.

The best thing about the movie is Ant-Man. What a likeable little fellow.

Much more interesting than Avengers was the trailer for another comic book movie: Joker. It seems to take inspiration from gritty 70s street movies like Taxi Driver but not in a vapid nostalgic way; there's something fresh about it. Even if the actual movie turns out not to be as good, I appreciate the effort to depart from the tracks that this genre seemd to be stuck in. That's the right direction.
(Edited)
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NarniaisAwesome

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Wow, you're so right!  Ant-Man was the best part.
I guess in my head the review sounded like it made the statement that, while not being AMAZING, it's also not TERRIBLE!
Do you think it's okay to mention a spoiler on here, or not?  (On this thread, I mean, not the review)
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albstein

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If you give a fat SPOILER warning, it should be okay.
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NarniaisAwesome

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Okay, then -  SPOILERS!!!!!!!

I thought having everyone come back to life (Doc Strange, Spider-Man, etc) was a mistake.  I mean, I know they have to do that so they make money of those character's movies, but franchising aside, I think that was dumb.  Perhaps it's my personal dislike of Peter Parker, but I think some of these characters should've stayed dead.  It makes for a better shocker, but also a lesson: Peter went up to space (against Tony's advice, if I remember it right) and he got killed.  Anyways, I just think that the whole 'everybody's back!' thing was just too expected.  
However, I agree with the kill-offs they did do.  Black Widow was always boring (to me) and Iron Man was getting old (not his age, really, just his character).  
But I think that Ant-Man is quite entertaining and so is Chris Pratt as Starlord.  I'm glad they're okay, lol!
(Edited)
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albstein

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SPOILERS continue

The one who bugs me most is Captain America, to be honest. What a boring 1950s posterboy, lol.

You're right about Iron Man. His arc is finished. He has gone from irresponsible anti-hero to full-blown self-sacrificing hero. The fact that the core avengers are put on the shelf for now actually makes me optimistic. Now that the grand finale is over, we might be getting superhero movies that take more creative risks and deviate from the established conventions. They don't need to fit perfectly into one big timeline anymore.

(*Kevin Feige smirks and looks at the proposal for "Avengers Meet the X-Men: Galaxy Wars", the first of five installments plus spin-offs)
(Edited)
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NarniaisAwesome

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Yes, now that the 'staples' are gone, we may see some new stuff.  (Expect for Spidey; don't know why I can't stand that kid?!)  My friend said that they are going to mix ALL the franchises: Marvel, X-Men, Fantastic 4, and maybe even DC!  Note: My friend, although I like them, has been known to get false info on movies from time to time.  So don't panic yet.
Yes, nice to see Cap is finished, too.  And no, sir - that is not America's a*s.  :/
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albstein

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I don't mind this Spiderman incarnation per se but the trailer for his new movie that came after Endgame disappointed me. He should really be the "friendly spider from your neighborhood" we all can kinda relate to in my opinion. Not every hero needs to meddle with the destruction of whole cities or planets and for chrissake he's still a child Tony, who do you think you are recruiting children for your war games?!
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NarniaisAwesome

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Yes, I agree.
In contrast to what seems like everyone else, I actually like Spider-Man 3.  It's well made, but also the amount of terror he fights is perfect.  Sand-Guy (whoever he is) and Venom were terrifying, but he fought them in his town, not in space or anything like that.  At any rate, Venom (but NOT the new Venom!) is way more exciting to fight than Michael Keaton, lol.
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albstein

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I have another unpopular opinion because I think the second Spider-Man just repeats everything the first one did story-wise and doesn't add much development (admittedly, the special effects improved). Number 3 was better than its reputation as far as I remember and Sand Guy (Sand Man?) is a villain worthy of some sympathy himself.
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NarniaisAwesome

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Yes, I liked how Sandman (I looked it up now, that is his name) was simply a hurt man and got to be good in the end.  But Willem Dafoe should be banned from ever being a supervillian again, lol.  He should stick to Bean's Holiday and play pompous directors.
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dgranger

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Defoe was in Aquaman. But did you guys catch the clues that Namur, the Sub-mariner is coming? There were three of them. 1) One of Black Panther’s Warrior Women had mentioned that there was something opening in the ocean. 2) There was a mark on a map where Atlantis was, and 3) the sound at the end of the credits was ether a ship’s bell or a bell people put on top of a bouy that marks the location of an underwater reef.
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NarniaisAwesome

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Oh, dear... so they really are mixing with DC?
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dgranger

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“Into The Woods” Disney’s adaption Of Sonheim’s musical that took fairy tales and gave them an adult twist to them and showed what happens to the characters after the fairy tale was over.
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NarniaisAwesome

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What did you think of it?
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dgranger

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It is good. But you got to know what to expect because it stands some fairy tale conventions up on it’s ear. I had known what was coming because I had seen the play before when the PBS stations had produced a production of it for their great performances series. Bernadette Peters (PBS) and Meryl Streep shines as the witch. Johnny Depp is at his most evilest as the big bad wolf. James Cordon is really good in this film.
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Peter, Champion

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Sorry to Bother You, 7/10

I like Lakeith Stanfield, but the movie gets a bit tiresome.