What was the last film you saw and how would you rate it? Pt. 18

  • 11
  • Idea
  • Updated 2 hours ago
  • (Edited)
Thought I'd post this here until I hear we're doing it somewhere else....

Post the name of the latest movie you've seen and your rating out of 10. 
-------------------------------------

Sunshine Boys (t0073766) - 7/10 - loved Burns, hated Matthau.
Photo of Jen

Jen, Champion

  • 4905 Posts
  • 2282 Reply Likes

Posted 2 years ago

  • 11
Photo of Jen

Jen, Champion

  • 4905 Posts
  • 2282 Reply Likes
Okja - 8/10 - both incredibly real and farcical at the same time.
Photo of rubyfruit76

rubyfruit76, Champion

  • 4343 Posts
  • 4814 Reply Likes
RBG (2018) - probably about a 7 or even 7.5: good but not quite worthy of the extraordinary subject, who elevates the movie to a higher plane -- and rating. 'Definitely  more "bumper sticker" -sized wisdom/ crowd pleaser than intelligent analysis but still, strongly recommended.
Photo of Jen

Jen, Champion

  • 4905 Posts
  • 2282 Reply Likes
Season 6 of The Americans - 7/10; entire series - 8/10
Photo of Jen

Jen, Champion

  • 4905 Posts
  • 2282 Reply Likes
Season 1 of The Keepers - 8/10 - so much evil in the world.
Photo of Jen

Jen, Champion

  • 4905 Posts
  • 2282 Reply Likes
Professor Marston and the Wonder Women - 6/10 - very pretty but ultimately didn't move me.
Photo of dgranger

dgranger

  • 2302 Posts
  • 1937 Reply Likes
Saw two films. Adrift 5 to 6slow and a ghost story.
Upgrade - it is basically “The Hands Of Orlac” updates this time with computer bioware enchantments plus a detective story and the ending to “A Clockwork Orange”. Rating yet to be determined.
Photo of NDbportmanfan 1

NDbportmanfan 1

  • 652 Posts
  • 454 Reply Likes
Hereditary (2018) - 8/10  

Toni Collette better win something for this performance, absolutely amazing. Oh and the film was great too    "CLICK" 
Photo of Jen

Jen, Champion

  • 4905 Posts
  • 2282 Reply Likes
Photo of Jen

Jen, Champion

  • 4905 Posts
  • 2282 Reply Likes
Ratatouille (re-watch) - 8/10
Photo of Jen

Jen, Champion

  • 4905 Posts
  • 2282 Reply Likes
Your Friend the Rat - 8/10
Lifted - 7/10
The Bourne Identity (re-watch) - 9/10
Photo of leavey-2

leavey-2

  • 1809 Posts
  • 1356 Reply Likes
Awake (2007) - 7/10
Photo of Jen

Jen, Champion

  • 4905 Posts
  • 2282 Reply Likes
Lord Lucan: My Husband, the Truth - 5/10 - didn't shed any new information on the story except to emphasize what idiotically shallow people the Lord and Lady were/are. I didn't have to pay to see it, but I want my 46 minutes back.
Photo of MAY SAM

MAY SAM

  • 3 Posts
  • 1 Reply Like
War for the Planet of the Apes (2017) - 7/10
(Edited)
Photo of ElMo

ElMo

  • 3481 Posts
  • 3697 Reply Likes
COCO 10/10

It seems like these days, Pixar, Disney and maybe the whole world of animation became a platform specially designed to preach "girl power" and tell children, especially girls, that anything-is-possible-when-you-truly-believe-in-yourself, I'm a father of a little girl so I shouldn't mind and the last great movie was "Inside Out" and it was about a girl and a female main protagonist... but even then, channelling the little boy inside me, I was waiting for the Disney movie about a boy... it's silly I know, but maturity isn't kids' strongest suit, no matter how 'precocious' they are. 

So I guess I had an instant liking on "Coco"... finally, it's a boy, and a sweet and jovial little boy in a poster that looked pretty cool. For some reason, I knew I would love the film. Was it a coincidence that the day a friend brought me the DVD, I was cooking tacos? Well, I guess the little boy inside was cheering, little did I know that the adult outside would also cheer and maybe weep a little more than the kid. Damn great films, just when you think you've seen it all, there comes a little gem of imagination that catches you off guard and grab you by the heart and plunge you in a universe that look magnificent on screen yet the magnificence is nothing compared to the inner beauty of the story. Sure, the film uses many familiar ingredients but the absolute originality doesn't exist... and isn't even part of the equation, it's all about the story and its final and emotional impact.

Although typical isn't the right word, but "Coco" does start with your "typical" Disney family, but you've got to love how atypical they are from Disney standards, yet typical in an archetypical way. The Riveiras, four generations of proud shoemakers are perhaps the only Mexican people to have banished music from their life... because the previous matriarch of the family was abandoned by her husband so he could pursue his career as a singer (the backstory-sequence is colorfully rendered in the beginning). The singer died, Music became a taboo and a golden rule was to never mention his name, ever. His last connection with the world of the living is Mama Coco, the great-grandmother of Miguel. Miguel is also your "typical" rebellious kid, his dream is to become a musician, he loves music yet not allowed to practice it. His idol is the great Ernesto de la Cruz, a crooner-idol whose tragic untimely death forged his legend. Miguel wants to walk in his path.

"Seize your moment" is the legend's motto, a hymn to every dreamer who wants to be a doer. And even if the phrasing conveys some opportunistic undertones, we want to embrace it, because well, isn't it true? What else is? Isn't anything indeed possible? Is accomplishing one's goal the ultimate success? Isn't it the purpose of life? When you have every member of a family leagued against a child, prohibiting any goal other than shoemaking, there's no doubt that family is poison and success everything... but, but but... this isn't exactly what the writers of "Coco" had in mind, this isn't the spirit of the movie... sure, the Riveiras strike as quite annoying dream-killers, sure, music plays a significant part, but it isn't an end in this film, it's a mean to reconcile the present with the past, to resurrect memories that have been buried in a ground of misunderstanding and bitterness. So many families can relate to that... unfortunately.

The spicy magic of "Coco" is to translate into fantasy elements, dazzling visuals and a beautiful song, many truths about life and death, just like "Inside Out" but with a variant in the existentialism that expands to the whole family, to that chain or circle of life transmitted from a generation to another. "Don't forget me, I'll always be there" says a dying character while pointing his index on his beloved one's heart, it's a common cliché but it's the only relief one could take with him to the 'long road". And "Coco" turns it into a simple but heartbreaking plea,  a simple song, "Remember me" and it says a lot about our deepest needs in life, to matter, to count and to be remembered... whether you believe in it or not, after watching "Coco", you just want to believe in an aftermath of life that allows to live as long as you're being remembered. Sometimes, I was wondering myself, there will come a time where everyone who knew me will be dead ... but aren't we all in the same boat?

Maybe not. Maybe fame is the ultimate the antidote against oblivion. Maybe that's why many people dream of imitating their idols, being the next best thing in their field of excellence, for posterity... did Newton, Pasteur or Marie Curie cared for posterity? I don't know. Interestingly, "Coco" doesn't say that posterity doesn't matter, it just says that it doesn't matter the way you think it does. And to stop being analytical, it simply gives a meaning to the idea of being part of a family in case,some of us have forgotten. We don't choose our families, but they're part of our DNA, of what makes us in right or wrong, it's there from the start and no matter how far we go, we can never forget where we started. in some exceptional cases, we should forget but this isn't the purpose of "Coco". The Riveiras are a united family but their edifice holds on a broken pillar, a torn piece of photograph, the bad man who wanted to be a musician. Apparently, his great-great-grandchild was caught by the same virus, you know what they say about the apple falling from the tree.

Miguel believes he must have faith in his dreams, like so many of us, and the adventure takes him in the Land of the Dead, where dead people are much alive, hanging on the memories of their families and their celebration during the 'Day of the Dead', the only occasion for them to visit the real world in a night where their pictures are surrounded with their personal items, candles and flower petals. Ever since Disney's seminal "Dance of Skeletons", there seems to be a mix of fascination and revulsion between the world of the dead and Disney. I guess it's only fitting that a universe that killed so many characters could provide us a consolative light of hope and allow the dead to show up once in a while. In "The Lion King", Mufasa even blamed Simba for having forgotten him by forgetting himself. It's a clever way to tell kids that death isn't final, the real death is when we're forgotten, processing this in mind, I had a weird thought, I figured out that maybe the reasons humans live long enough to see their grandchildren grow is to being remembered for a much longer time.

The adventure in the world of the Dead with Hector, all the dead Riveiras and the idol de la Cruz is a wonderful journey like only Disney animators at the top of their game can provide, a movie about family, about values we can all relate to, about these notions such as forgiving and forgetting. The film reminded me of many classics, when I saw "It's a Wonderful Life" for the first time, I wished more people could have the chance to realize the extent of their accomplishments, when I saw "Back to the Future", I couldn't help but think of the way reality works, when a mistake or a wasted opportunity can affect your life forever and there's no coming back. "Coco" filled my mind with similar thoughts, so many people die without coming to terms, so many families spend their life in resentment and conflict, so many people live apart when they have so much to share and so many grandchildren don't realize what a blessing having grandparents still alive can be and yet are never curious to know a little more about their family, their roots. 

This is how the film spoke to me, many people have dreams, want to become someone, to accomplish things, but instead of seizing the moments, make the "wisest" choice, in the name of family and responsibility... but we live in a world that cherishes dreamers, starting with Disney... and the tragedy is that we spend our life blaming our self for these choices... "Coco" ended up with a positive message not about accomplishment but about family, indeed, and it made me feel like Dorothy when she concluded a wonderful adventure saying "There's no place like home", the film moved me and made me feel a little better with myself ... and that was something I didn't see co-coming. 
Photo of Kyle Perez

Kyle Perez

  • 2125 Posts
  • 1185 Reply Likes
You made me watch it again :) Such a great film and the visuals.. man oh man.. Pixar just out did themselves with this one. Masterpiece (or, rather, "obra maestra"!)
Photo of Stephen Atwood

Stephen Atwood

  • 1055 Posts
  • 734 Reply Likes
Photo of NDbportmanfan 1

NDbportmanfan 1

  • 652 Posts
  • 454 Reply Likes
The Florida Project (2017) 8/10

It was worthy of the hype!
Photo of Abi

Abi

  • 73 Posts
  • 100 Reply Likes
Bad Kids of Crestview Academy - 8/10

Slasher Season 1 (Series) - 10/10
Slasher Season 2 (Series) - 10++/10

Harper's Island (Mini-Series) - 10/10

Ravenswood (Series) - 7/10
(Edited)
Photo of Jen

Jen, Champion

  • 4905 Posts
  • 2282 Reply Likes
The Score (re-watch) - 8/10 - from the trivia on this one Brando seems like a major asshole.
(Edited)
Photo of ElMo

ElMo

  • 3481 Posts
  • 3697 Reply Likes
I used to think of old people as serious and wise  but movies and books have failed me, many of them actually act like jerks as they grow older, sometimes in a very childish way. Brando was known to be a joker and an unpredictable person, I wouldn't be surprised that it got worse with age... but I wouldn't blame him too much on that either.
Photo of Jen

Jen, Champion

  • 4905 Posts
  • 2282 Reply Likes
These two anecdotes are the ones that really annoyed me:
Marlon Brando took to calling Director Frank Oz "Fozzy" and "Miss Piggy" during this movie. Oz has been the voice of Fozzy Bear and Miss Piggy in the various Muppet productions since the beginning. Brando's hazing of Oz over his work with the Muppets got so bad, that Robert De Niro was forced to direct Brando instead, with Oz giving him instructions via headset.
- During breaks, Marlon Brando would walk around the set naked because of the warm weather where the film was being shot.

I mean, come on!
Photo of Jen

Jen, Champion

  • 4905 Posts
  • 2282 Reply Likes
Shutter Island (re-watch) - barely 7/10 - the book was sooooo much better.
Photo of Abi

Abi

  • 73 Posts
  • 100 Reply Likes
Loved Shutter Island, 10/10 in my book.

I never read the book, though my mum did.

I liked how Scorcese made the ending ambiguous in the film; which I believe was not the case in the novel.
Photo of Kyle Perez

Kyle Perez

  • 2125 Posts
  • 1185 Reply Likes
Some nice re-watches this week:

Coco (2017) and The Incredibles (2004) - both 10/10. Both are Top 5 Pixar IMO.

Also caught up with a couple shows this week:

Season 2 of Master of None: 9 or 10. I don't rate my shows but damn, what a killer season. One of the most underrated shows out there today, just phenomenal. 

Season 2 of 13 Reasons Why: 7 or 8. Just an OK season, bad when compared to the first one in terms of storytelling and character development. Feel like they overused the whole dead Hannah element.. all in all, entertaining but unnecessary. 
Photo of Kyle Perez

Kyle Perez

  • 2125 Posts
  • 1185 Reply Likes
Last night:

Incredibles 2 (2018): 9/10. Worth the wait and such a great way to build on its predecessor. Action, emotion, just so much fun!

Bao (2018) (Pixar's short before I2): 9/10. Exceptional piece of magic... the story is immensely creative and emotional. Bonus points for it taking place against the backdrop of Toronto. Great work by everyone involved with this one. 
Photo of Jen

Jen, Champion

  • 4905 Posts
  • 2282 Reply Likes
The "deaf" episode and the Thanksgiving episode of Master of None were A-MA-ZING!

I've read that Aziz Ansari might never make another season. That all the territory has been covered. :(
Photo of Kyle Perez

Kyle Perez

  • 2125 Posts
  • 1185 Reply Likes
Those are great episodes Jen! Incredibly unique and I loved how they were executed.. I loved the "Old People" and "mornings" episode.. also loved how the intro episode to S2 was a 30-minute homage to Bicycle Thieves (1948). Great show all around! I hope he does come back with another :(
Photo of albstein

albstein

  • 682 Posts
  • 1337 Reply Likes
A Man of his Word (2018): 6/10.

Director Wim Wenders was present at the premiere. He spoke about how he was approached by a cinephile Vatican prefect to make a film about Pope Francis. Apparently, the prefect is a fan of Wender's works, but the pope hasn't seen any of them and the last movies he's been to were Italian neorealist ones in the 1950s. A Man of his Word is an almost non-budget project so all we get is stock footage mixed with a newly recorded interview.
Francis talked to Wenders only over a screen right next to the camera. In the film, it makes the impression that the pope speaks directly to the audience.

It is the usual - we should respect nature, stop being greedy, take more time for our families, and smile once in a while. The pope is a charismatic man and he seems genuinely nice, but what does he actually do, or what is so radical about what he says? That doesn't quite get clear in the film.

There are scenes where Francis speaks in front of the UN assembly, and everyone nods in agreement, or in front of the US congress, when even generals seem to be moved. But I think if the Pope was really as revolutionary as the film claims, they wouldn't have met him as warmly.
Wenders also shot a few scenes about Francis of Assisi, the 13th century saint. He said some journalists wrote this was footage from an old movie (I was fooled as well). But really the team used a very old black and white camera and minimal costume equipment. Wenders was embarassed to admit that there were cars in the background, but he should be proud that no one noticed.
Photo of Jen

Jen, Champion

  • 4905 Posts
  • 2282 Reply Likes
Murder on the Orient Express - 8/10 - some interesting camera shots, especially the opening looking down the Wailing Wall from above. Branagh's Poirot was much more likable than many of the other Poirots. The story is...well, the same...can't really do much about that. Once you've seen it twice no matter what version there are no surprises.
Advanced Style - 8/10 - very sweet - I've been viewing this blog for several years. Nice to see the ladies on video. 
Photo of Jen

Jen, Champion

  • 4905 Posts
  • 2282 Reply Likes
Season one of 13 Reasons Why - 8/10 - loved the use of music - it was a character of itself. I was surprised when the final song that kicked in is my favorite Bob Mould song.

I liked this quite a bit but I've read that season two is terrible, so I'm a bit leery of watching it.
Photo of Kyle Perez

Kyle Perez

  • 2125 Posts
  • 1185 Reply Likes
Watch Season 2 but just know that it's not as good.. if you like the characters, you'll probably just enjoy seeing them in their environment again. Consider at your own risk..
Photo of leavey-2

leavey-2

  • 1809 Posts
  • 1356 Reply Likes
Sense8 (Season1) - The Wachowskis at their very best. Refreshing, original, breathtaking at times - 10/10
Photo of Stephen Atwood

Stephen Atwood

  • 1055 Posts
  • 734 Reply Likes
(Edited)