Live Poll: Franchises That Lasted for Generations

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  • (Edited)
Some movie-franchises are so popular, that they were continued for two or more decades. The ideas of these movie-franchises are so unique and/or popular that fans crave new movie-releases. Mostly they have fans over two or more generations.

What is your pick from the franchises below?

Only big money movie franchises lasting more than 2 decades with a worldwide boxoffice (all-in-all) above 300 million dollars.

List: https://www.imdb.com/list/ls022003401/

Poll: https://www.imdb.com/poll/7eg_b3uiHNA/
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Breumaster

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  • excited

Posted 2 years ago

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Stephen N Russell

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007, Star Trek, Robin Hood, Terminator.
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Breumaster

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They're already in the list. ;)
But I appreciate your ideas.
(Edited)
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Breumaster

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Just wanted to correct one thing: Only movies, no TV-Series.
And movie-themes or franchises.
(Edited)
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Ibrahim Akhtar

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Batman theme.

A minor typo:
Feel free to contribute or discuss.
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Breumaster

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Thank you. My keyboard sometimes has a lag. Sometimes it swallows types. ;)
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Dan Dassow, Champion

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Breumaster,

For your consideration:
Close to 100 years of Zorro
https://www.imdb.com/find?q=Zorro&s=tt
The Mark of Zorro (1920) through Zorro (2019)

Over 90 years of Sherlock Holmes
https://www.imdb.com/find?ref_=nv_sr_fn&q=Sherlock
Sherlock Jr. (1924) through Sherlock Holmes 3 (2020)

Over 70 years of Captain America
https://www.imdb.com/find?ref_=nv_sr_fn&q=Captain+America
Captain America (1944) through Captain America: Civil War (2016)

Over 80 years of Flash Gordon
https://www.imdb.com/find?ref_=nv_sr_fn&q=Flash+Gordon
Flash Gordon (1936) through Flash Gordon (in development)

Over 80 years of Frankenstein
https://www.imdb.com/find?ref_=nv_sr_fn&q=Frankenstein
Frankenstein (1931) through Fran K.: Frankenstein (2018) (TV Movie)

Over 80 years of Dracula
https://www.imdb.com/find?ref_=nv_sr_fn&q=Dracula
Dracula (1931) through Dracula (2016)
(Edited)
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Breumaster

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P.S.: The 400 million-hurdle is debateable. I just don't want any crappy installment suggested. All your contributions are worthy but I have to avoid an overwhelming  flood of FYCs. The main Frankenstein-movies just got all-in-all about about 303 million (according to boxofficemojo) Maybe I can put the hurdle a little down. Or do you have any good idea, to keep them in? So I can do that.  :D
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Dan Dassow, Champion

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Breumaster,
$400 million seems like a good threshold. You can always adjust the threshold lower when it becomes apparent a lower threshold won't result in too many choices.

Please tell your wife, AKA Breufrau, thanks.
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Breumaster

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My honney smiled from ear to ear hearing her new nickname. ;)
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Breumaster

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Just sat the hurdle to 300 millions, so Frankenstein is in.
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Breumaster

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*bump*
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Breumaster

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*Bump*
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leavey-2

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Over 55 years of James Bond.
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Breumaster

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I felt free to add 3 movie themes:

'Halloween', 'A Nightmare on Elmstreet' & 'Friday the 13th'

They all three have one in common:

Nearly 300 Million or over. The lowest of them three was 290 Millions, the Highest I could find out was at ~297 millions domestic.The results are so low, because when the franchise or theme started, there were no boxoffice-results worldwide available. By these big movie themes, that lasted over decades, I assume the world-wide-profits would easily be over 300 Millions. So I took them three on the list.
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Jessica, Champion

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Good one!

Could you please remove the period in the title:
Movie-Themes That Lasted for Generations

Typo in #23: Krueger, and #24: Voorhees
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Jessica, Champion

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Oh, 'Generations' is fine, I just meant that you should remove the dot after the word.

Current title:
Movie-Themes That Lasted for Generations.

New title:
Movie-Themes That Lasted for Generations
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Breumaster

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Ohhh, okay! That was a big mistake by my language hurdles. I allways stumble over the word period. I'll correct it back. ;) Period equal to dot. I'll learn that in this life. ;) What do you think about the intro? :D
(Edited)
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Breumaster

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Thank you, Jessica. :D
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Jessica, Champion

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No problem. :)

Actually, the word 'theme' can also refer to music. Since music is not the focus of your poll, perhaps you should change 'movie-themes' to 'franchises', to avoid any confusion.

Franchises That Lasted for Generations

Some franchises are so popular, that they were continued for two or more decades. The idea of this movie-theme or franchise is so unique and/or popular that fans crave for new movie-releases. Mostly they have fans over two or more generations. What is your pick from the franchises below?
(Edited)
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Breumaster

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Thank you for telling me about the word themes in relation to music. It's the thing that I allready knew it. The essence of the problem is that I don't know if in america there is a border between the movies in later past, even when not connected to another maybe called a franchise. The rules of what is ok to be called a franchise. The movies from 1918 to 1998 - it's not the same franchise or is it? I would have thought no. But if this doesn't play a role, i can write franchise on it. I've allways seen a row of movies in a franchise to let be a franchise. But if that dosn't count I can write franchise and it's fine. :D So I now did perviously.
(Edited)
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rubyfruit76, Champion

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'Good poll!  Either Sherlock Holmes or Star Wars. 

May I suggest a few edits? (below in bold)

Some movie-franchises are so popular, that they were continued for two or more decades. The ideas of these movie-franchises are so unique and/or popular that fans crave new movie-releases. Mostly they have fans over two or more generations.

What is your pick from the franchises below?

Only big money movie franchises lasting more than 2 decades and with a worldwide boxoffice (all-in-all) above 300 million dollars. 

: )
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Breumaster

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Hi rubyfruit76. :D
You're right. I will change that. It would look like a foolish text sometimes.
I often wonder why I didn't see such bugs in my texts. Thank you for
feeling free to show me a better way to express my contents.

My wife and me are the authors in co-work, this time. She had the idea,
we did work it out. Dan, Jessica, Ibrahim and you are big helpers for
keeping the right form and contributing content.

Nice project. I love it. :D
(Edited)
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rubyfruit76, Champion

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It is a nice project. I think that's so sweet that you thanked your wife in the intro. The two of you made a good poll. 

As a writer, I can absolutely assure you that it's always a lot easier to see bugs in someone else's text than in one's own work. That's why the world made editors, lol. When I was in graduate school, our workshops were about eight of us just sitting around a table and suggesting ideas for and editing each other's writing - for three hours. :) 

Thank you, also, for the "thank you" but all I do is try to give feedback that's as helpful as the feedback that all of you give me for my polls. :)
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Breumaster

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My wife is a writer, too (original fantasystorys). She has a great imagination and is also a big movie-fan like me. :D
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Jessica, Champion

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Congratulations! 

Live Poll: https://www.imdb.com/poll/7eg_b3uiHNA/
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Breumaster

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Yay ! :D  Thank you all ! :)
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Dimos Dicoudis

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Nice concept for a poll. It reminds me of a line from "Bram Stoker's Dracula" (1992), concerning vampires: "These creatures do not die like the bee after the first sting, but instead grow strong and become immortal once infected by another nosferatu. So, my friends, we fight not one beast, but legions that go on age after age after age, feeding on the blood of the living."

Note that several characters are adaptations into film from earlier sources. Concerning the various characters/franchises and their relevant vitality:

*Robin Hood. Origin unclear. Several ballads concerning the character were in circulation in 15th- century England, some of which were preserved in manuscripts. The earliest manuscript tale is likely "Robin Hood and the Monk" (c. 1450), but allusions to Robin Hood appear earlier in the narrative poem "Piers Plowman"  (c. 1370), and various historical figures using similar names and aliases start appearing in the 13th century. The character is possibly based on various medieval outlaws and rebels, and there is some evidence that the name was used as a stock alias for historical outlaws for a number of centuries. First adapted into film in the silent short film "Robin Hood and His Merry Men" (1908). Robin Hood has over 50 appearances in film (as either a main or supporting character), plus several television series, video games, etc. (Not counting characters inspired by Robin Hood, such as Green Arrow, or copycats of Robin Hood. Some of the Robin Hood supporting characters have also appeared in stories without Robin.)
*Beauty and the Beast. Characters and concept created by French novelist Gabrielle-Suzanne Barbot de Villeneuve (1685-1755) for the story "La Belle et la Bête" (1740). Note that Villeneuve borrowed some elements of her story from earlier tales by Lucius Apuleius Madaurensis (c. 124-170) and Giovanni Francesco Straparola (c. 1485-1558). An abridged and toned down version of Villeneuve's story was published by Jeanne-Marie Leprince de Beaumont (1711-1780) in 1756, and served as the source for most later adaptations. First adapted into film in the French short film "La belle et la bête" (1899). At least 15 different feature films based on the tale have been produced, along with several short films and imitations. 
*Frankenstein. Victor Frankenstein and Frankenstein's monster were created by novelist Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley (married name of Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin, 1797-1851) for the novel "Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus" (1818). 2018 marks the novel's bicentennial, (counting the publication date, as it was actually written in 1816-1817). First adapted into film in the short film "Frankensrein" (1910) by the Edison Manufacturing Company (owned by Thomas Edison). Both main characters have appeared in at least 90 films, with several films depicting their descendants or other monsters created by the Frankenstein family. The novel has received adaptation in all mediums of fiction. 
*Ebenezer Scrooge. Character created by Charles Dickens (1812-1870) for the novella "A Christmas Carol in Prose, Being a Ghost-Story of Christmas" (1843). First adapted into film with the British short film "Scrooge, or, Marley's Ghost" (1901) by special-effects pioneer Walter Robert Booth (1869-1938), one of the earliest films featuring ghosts and hauntings. The story has received at least 50 different film adaptations, and a very large number of television adaptations, and adaptations in other media. Dickens intended the story to serve as advocacy for humanitarianism, and differing views on this message have shaped most of the adaptations. (Not counting characters named after Scrooge, like Scrooge McDuck, or a number of copycats of Scrooge,)
*Sherlock Holmes. Character created by Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930) for the novel "A Study in Scarlet" (1887). First adapted into film with the short film "Sherlock Holmes Baffled" (1900) by the American Mutoscope and Biograph Company. The film is considered one of the earliest  narrative films (films with plots instead of random scenes. Holmes is estimated to have appeared in about 200 films, along with novels, short stories, comic books, and television series. 
*Dracula. Character created by Bram Stoker (1847-1912) for the gothic novel "Dracula". Stoker also incorporated references to the historical figure Vlad III Dracula/Vlad the Impaler, Voivode of Wallachia (c. 1428-1476/1477, reign 1448, 1456-1462, 1476), who he implied was a previous identity of the vampire. First adapted into film in the Hungarian film "Dracula's Death" (1921), though the film which influenced most of Dracula's early film appearances was the German "Nosferatu: A Symphony of Horror" (1922, where Dracula appears under the alias "Count Orlok".) Dracula has appeared in about 200 films, sometimes under the aliases Orlok (who is at times depicted as a separate character) and Alucard (Dracula spelled backwards). He has also appeared in many television series, novels, comics, theatrical plays, and nearly every medium of fiction. As a trope, several vampires and other characters are introduced as sons, daughters, and other descendants of Dracula. (Not counting parodies such as Count Duckula, characters inspired by Dracula, or copycats of Dracula. Various characters of the original novel and their descendants have also appeared as protagonists in their own stories.)
*Tarzan. Character created by Edgar Rice Burroughs (1875-1950) for the novel "Tarzan of the Apes" (1912). First adapted into film in the silent film "Tarzan of the Apes" (1918) by First National Pictures (a company later absorbed into Warner Bros.). Between 70 to 80 Tarzan films have been produced. Most of the ones produced between 1932 and 1960 were part of the same film series and shared some continuity. Most of the later ones are one-shots, featuring different versions of the character. Tarzan has also appeared in 12 television series, and a large number of novels, short stories, and comics. Tarzan has appeared nearly non-stop in comics since receiving his own comic strip in 1929. (Not counting characters inspired by Tarzan or copycats of Tarzan. Also not counting spin-off characters with their own novels, introduced by Burroughs and other writers.)
*Zorro. Character created by Johnston McCulley (1883-1958) for the novel "The Curse of Capistrano" (1919). First adapted into film "The Mark of Zorro" (1920) by United Artists, a swashbuckler film. Zorro (and legacy characters taking over the masked identity) has appeared in about 40 films, 11 television series (live-action and animated ones included), many novels and short stories, and spin-off series of comics and video games. (Not counting characters inspired by Zorro or copycats of Zorro.)
*King Kong. Character created by screenwriters Merian Caldwell Cooper (1893-1973) and Edgar Wallace (1875-1932) for the film "King Kong" (1933). Wallace also wrote a "King Kong" short story separate from the film, which was published posthumously. Only 8 "official" Kong films have been released, but there have been various unauthorized uses of Kong in other films. Kong has also starred in three television series, and received adaptations in various other media. Due to decades of legal disputes, the rights to the character are shared between several companies. 
*Superman. Character created by Jerry Siegel (1914-1996) and Joe Shuster (1914-1992) for the comic book "Action Comics" #1 (June, 1938). First adapted into film with the animated short "Superman"/"The Mad Scientist" (1941) by Fleischer Studios. Superman starred in his own series of 17 animated shorts from 1941 to 1943, produced first by Fleischer Studios and then by Famous Studios. First adapted into live-action film with the film serial "Superman" (1948). So far, the character has appeared in 11 live-action theatrical films, a number of animated films (often as a supporting cast member), a large number of television series (live-action and animated), and various spin-off media. In comics, he has appeared nearly non-stop since 1938. One of the few "Golden Age" characters who never went out of print. (Not counting various supporting characters and villains who have headlined their own series.)
*Batman. Character and concept created by Bob Kane (1915-1998) and Bill Finger (1914-1994) for the comic book "Detective Comics" #27 (May, 1939). First adapted into film in the film serial "Batman" (1943) by Columbia Pictures. So far Batman has appeared in 13 live-action theatrical films, one theatrical animated film, an ever-increasing number of animated video films, a large number of television series (both as a main character and a supporting cast member), and nearly non-stop in comic books since 1939. One of the few "Golden Age" characters who never went out of print. (Not counting various supporting characters and villains who have headlined their own series.)
*Captain America. Character created by Joe Simon (1913-2011) and Jack Kirby (1917-1994) for the comic book "Captain America Comics" #1 (March, 1941). First adapted into film in the film serial "Captain America" (1944) by Republic Pictures. So far the Captain has starred in five theatrical films, two television films. He has also appeared in various crossover films, television series, numerous comic books, and a few spin-off media. 
*James Bond. The main character was created by Ian Fleming (1908-1964) for the novel "Casino Royale" (1953). First adapted for television in a 1954 episode of the anthology series "Climax!", first adapted for film in "Dr. No" (1962). So far, Bond has appeared in 24 films by Eon Productions, 2 films by rival companies, various parodies, and an ever-increasing number of novels and short stories. 
*Godzilla/Gojira. Character created by Tomoyuki Tanaka (1910-1997), Ishiro Honda (1911-1993), and Eiji Tsuburaya (1901-1970) for the film "Godzilla" (1954). So far, Godzilla has appeared in 29 films by Toho, three original films by American companies, three American films that are modified adaptations of Japanese films, 6 television series, and spin-off series of comics and video games. 
*The Muppets. Characters and concept created by puppeteer Jim Henson (1936-1990) for the television series "Sam and Friends" (1955-1961). First adapted into film with the feature film "The Muppet Movie" (1979). So far the characters have appeared in 8 theatrical films, a few television films and video films, many television specials, 8 television series, a number of spin-off comics and video games. (Not counting minor segments and guest appearances in other shows.)
*Star Trek. Concept created by screenwriter Gene Roddenberry (1921-1991) for the television series "Star Trek: The Original Series" (1966-1969). First adapted into film in "Star Trek: The Motion Picture" (1979), intended as a sequel to the series. So fat the franchise includes 7 television series, 13 theatrical films, and a large number of comics, novels, and video games. One of the most notable examples of the "space opera" and "space western" sub-genres of science fiction. 
*John Rambo. Character created by Canadian novelist David Morrell (1943-) for the novel "First Blood" (1972). Morrell has claimed that the character was partly based on a then-recently deceased historical figure: Audie Murphy (1925-1971), a highly decorated World War II veteran who was famously suffering from  "post traumatic stress disorder" (PTSD) due to his war-related experiences. 
Rambo was first adapted into film with the feature film "First Blood" (1982), where he is depicted as a homeless veteran of the Vietnam War. The film series only includes 4 films. The franchise also includes an animated television series and a few video games. 
*Rocky. The character Rocky Balboa was created by screenwriter Sylvester Stallone (1946-) for the film "Rocky" (1976). So far Rocky has appeared in 7 theatrical films. There is a spin-off series of video games, but relatively few other spin-offs. 
*"Star Wars". Concept created for the film "Star Wars" (1977) by George Lucas (1944-). 11 theatrical films so far, three notable television films, five television series, and a large number of novels and comic books. 
*Halloween. The concept for the series and lead character Michael Myers were created by screenwriters John Carpenter (1948-) and Debra Hill (1950-2005) for the film "Halloween" (1978). So far, the film series includes 10 films, with an 11th one scheduled for release later in 2018. The franchise also includes 4 novelizations, 3 spin-off novels, and a number of comic book series. 
*"Alien". Concept created by screenwriters Dan O'Bannon (1946-2009) and Ronald Shusett (1935-), and re-written when their script was picked for the original film "Alien" (1979-). So far, the franchise includes 6 theatrical films, two crossover films, and spin-off series of comics, novels, and video games. 
*"Friday the 13th". The main concept of the series and the characters Pamela and Jason Voorhees were created by screenwriter Victor Miller (1940-) fot the film "Friday the 13th" (1980). The film series includes 12 films, one of which is a sequel. The franchise also includes a spin-off television series, novelizations, comic books, and a few video games. 
*Indiana Jones. Character created by George Lucas (1944-), though loosely based on three previous fictional characters: Allan Quatermain, Professor Challenger, and Scrooge McDuck (with some additional elements from James Bond, Northwest Smith, and one-shot character Harry Steele). First appeared in film in "Raiders of the Lost Ark" (1981). So far Jones has appeared in 4 theatrical films, one television series, various television films based on the series, and spin-off novels, comic books, and video games. 
*Tron. Concept created by screenwriter Steven Lisberger (1951-) for the film "Tron" (1982). The film series so far includes only 2 films, but has been adapted into a television series, a number of comics, and a relatively large number of videogames. 
*Terminator. Story and concept mostly developed by James Cameron (1954-) and film producer Gale Anne Hurd (1955-) for the film "The Terminator" (1984). So far the various Terminators have appeared in 5 theatrical films, one television series, and spin-off series of comics and video games. 
*"A Nightmare on Elm Street". The main concept of the series and lead character Freddy Krueger were created by screenwriter Wes Craven (1939-2015) for the film "A Nightmare on Elm Street" (1984). The film series includes 9 films, one of which is a crossover. The franchise also includes a spin-off television series, various comic book series (starting in 1989), and a few video games. 
*"Transformers". Toyline created by toy executive Nobuyuki Okude (1944-) in 1984, though incorporating elements from the previous toylines "Microman" and "Diaclone". Most of the original characters were introduced in the comic book series by Marvel Comics (May, 1984-May, 1991) and the first animated television series (September, 1984-November, 1987). First adapted into film with the theatrical animated film "The Transformers: The Movie" (1986), first adapted into live-action film with "Transformers" (2007). The characters and related concepts have appeared in 5 live-action films, at least 3 animated films, about 20 animated television series (not counting the Go-Bots series which was later incorporated into the franchise), a large number of comic books, and spin-off novels, radio shows, and video games. Most of the productions originate in either Japan or the United States, with rights currently shared between Hasbro and Takara Tomy. A new series produced by Boulder Media, an Irish animation studio, is reportedly in production. 
*Ghostbusters. Characters and concept created by screenwriters Dan Aykroyd (1952-) and Harold Ramis (1944-2014) for the film "Ghostbusters" (1984). The concept is similar to Filmation's "Ghost Busters" franchise (which is older), but features different characters. The series so far includes three live-action films. The franchise also includes two animated television series, a few comic book series (starting in 1988), and several video games. 
*"Predator". Concept and characters created by screenwriter duo Jim Thomas and John Thomas (brothers to each other) for the film "Predator" (1987). Shane Black (1961-) is also known to have contributed to the film's script, without receiving official credit. So far, the Predators have appeared in 3 regular films, 2 crossover, films, a large number of comic books, and a few video games. A fourth film in the series is scheduled for release later in 2018. 
*Jurassic Park. Concept created by Michael Crichton (1942-2008) for the novel "Jurassic Park" (1990). First adapted into film for the theatrical film Jurassic Park (1993). So far the concept has appeared in two original novels by Crichton, 5 films, at least three spin-off novels, and a few minor adaptations. 
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Breumaster

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At first - thank you for explaining in detail. That's much to read. I need a little time to answere adequate. And I apologize previously for being very much shorter in words. :)
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gromit82, Champion

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Although Sherlock Jr. is my favorite silent film, I don't think it's a good representation of the Sherlock Holmes franchise. Buster Keaton's character in the film is an aspiring detective but he's definitely not the Sherlock Holmes character created by Arthur Conan Doyle.
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Breumaster

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I guess, you are right. Do you have suggestions about? :)
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gromit82, Champion

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Breumaster: I take it that you would prefer to use a film that (a) has a poster available on IMDb, (b) is an early example of the franchise, and (c) has a title which consists of or resembles the franchise name. If so, Sherlock Holmes (1916) would meet your criteria.

Another plausible representation, although a couple of decades more recent, would be The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (1939) starring Basil Rathbone.

(If you were just going for a really famous and successful example, you could use one of the films starring Robert Downey Jr. as Sherlock Holmes, but there had been films about Holmes for more than a hundred years before Downey took the role, so I guess that's not what you were looking for.)
(Edited)
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Breumaster

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Ok, I understand. It sure should also be a as old as possible movie to keep a wide time span for the franchise. And when it should be about the real Sherlock Holmes, then it should content an original story. I know that movie with Buster Keaton is not really about the real Sherlock Holmes, but is the 1916's franchise? I haven't seen Arthur Conan Doyle as writer credit on the 1916's movie's site you linked. It seems to be just another non Arthur Conan Doyle story movie. But I haven't seen that.

The other thing is, that the poll runs, yet. And I don't know how to start a re-push. I just know, there is a page on getsatisfaction where you can state why you want that. But I would need a little guidance to ask for. ;)  I will go to sleep now. Maybe tomorrow. But I don't forget. :) Thank you for your contributions. :)
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gromit82, Champion

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My understanding is that the 1916 Sherlock Holmes does indeed depict the real Conan Doyle character. According to Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sherlock_Holmes_(1916_film), the film was adapted from an 1899 play also titled Sherlock Holmes which had been authorized by Arthur Conan Doyle himself. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sherlock_Holmes_(play)

The 1916 film reportedly takes plot elements from three of Conan Doyle's Holmes stories: "A Scandal in Bohemia", "The Final Problem", and A Study in Scarlet.

So I would say that it really is a Sherlock Holmes movie. If the Writers Guild of America had been around in 1916, Arthur Conan Doyle would have gotten some kind of writing credit, but it wasn't.
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Stephen N Russell

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Star Trek, Tarzan, Superman, 
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Ibrahim Akhtar

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This just came in my mind.

About 50 years of jungle book(or Mowgli)
https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0061852/...
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Dan Dassow, Champion

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Congratulations Breumaster on your 5th live poll! As of 13-Jun-2018 11:43 PM Pacific your polls have 2,680 or more votes, for an average of 536 votes per poll.

Franchises That Lasted for Generations
6559th Live Poll: https://www.imdb.com/poll/7eg_b3uiHNA/
Seen: http://www.imdb.com/seen//ls022003401

This is the 2,900th Title poll. Such polls have a total of 7,110,268 votes for an average of 2,452 votes per poll.
Total Number of Votes			15,639,578
Projected Date of 20 Million Votes	04-Jan-2020
Days Until 20 Million Votes		568
This is the list of Breumaster's polls as of 7-Jun-2018:

Sorted Alphabetically http://mypollwatch.blogspot.com/2014/05/imdb-polls-alphabetical-by-author.html#Breumaster

In Decreasing Order of Votes http://mypollwatch.blogspot.com/2015/03/imdb-polls-descending-order-of-votes-by.html#Breumaster

Alphabetical List of Polls http://mypollwatch.blogspot.com/2014/03/imdb-polls-alphabetical.html

Top IMDb Polls http://mypollwatch.blogspot.com/2015/07/top-imdb-polls.html

IMDb Polls - Descending Order of Votes http://mypollwatch.blogspot.com/2013/12/imdb-polls-descending-order-of-votes.html

Summary Statistics http://mypollwatch.blogspot.com/2016/05/summary-statistics.html

Key Threads - IMDb Poll FAQs Index https://getsatisfaction.com/imdb/topics/faq-key-threads-imdb-poll-faqs-index

How to Improve the Chance of Having your Poll on the Home Page https://getsatisfaction.com/imdb/topics/faq-how-to-improve-the-chance-of-having-your-poll-on-the-hom...