inconsistencies in an actor's profile (being in a movie although he is dead for 3 years)

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According to IMDB Jeff Conway (http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0001063) dies 2011.

Why is he listed as an actor for a movie which is set to be released 2014 and is in state 'filming'?
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Helmut Tessarek

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Posted 6 years ago

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Helmut Tessarek

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hello, anyone?
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LuvsToResearch, Champion

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Hard to say. His name is Jeff Conaway, not Conway but it is feasible that one of the six (6) Jeff Conway(s) should have the credit; or voice and or filming of his part took place earlier, or archive footage was used or??..it will take some research to find out which means no immediate answers. However, it is fairly clear that Jeff Conaway did die in 2011.
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Emperor, Champion

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Well it might be:
  • A different Jeff Conway
  • A role he filmed before dying - we sometimes see people appearing in films 4 or 5 years after they died because films get caught in development hell and/or get sent back for reshoots.
You'd need to do some searching around to find out the truth.


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Helmut Tessarek

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If it was a different Jeff Conaway, the films would not be listed under his name.

Please, have a look at http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0001063/

There are movies in 'filming' status, so something seems to be wrong.

I understand that archived footage might be used, but in this case an additional tag would be a great idea, don't you think?

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bluesmanSF, Champion

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The film makers have acknowledged his passing in the credits.  So, I'm going to guess it's accurate.

Thanks 

Jeff Conaway

...

in memory of


Screen Actors Guild

...

thanks


Hollywood Way Pictures

...

special thanks


Theess Skateboards

...

very special thanks


Theess Surfboards

...

very special thanks

This comes up fairly often and is even discussed in the FAQ's section of the Help area:

http://www.imdb.com/help/search?domain=helpdesk_faq&index=1&file=reevessuperman&ref_=hlp...

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Helmut Tessarek

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I don't understand why the year of release is used instead of the year of production.
It should be logical that the year should indicate the year the movie was made.
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bluesmanSF, Champion

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And, if it takes 10 years to make, which of the ten do you use?  Started? Completed? Most work done?

I guess there can be different ways to look at it but what is most important is to decide, then keep it consistent.  The site uses release dates as that can can be difficult to argue, when production-based dates can be difficult to state with accuracy, for those of us submitting data.  It's not like it's generally advertised anywhere, though there can be sources for some titles.
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Helmut Tessarek

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The date of production should be the date it was completed. Because only then you could watch the movie as it was intended.

Of course there should be fields in the database for start, end, release and so on, but the movie should have the date, when it was completed, in the title.
This makes the most sense, wouldn't you agree?
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bluesmanSF, Champion

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It makes sense if the data is available to people who make the data submissions to IMDb.  I would think a great many titles will not have specific dates available.  But, most titles listed have either aired or screened on specific dates per country.  To say the date for a title is the date production was completed might leave a significant number of titles without a year attached. 

Of course it would be best to have complete, accurate information shown...but they need to choose a date that could be given that will be accurate and available for the greatest percentage of titles listed. 

Are you aware of a resource for locating filming dates, dates completed (which can be changed, of course...so it would have to include any further work that is added...editing out for ratings, editing back in for how the "movie was intended" to be, etc.), release date, etc.?  Would this include international data, data about indie releases, etc.?
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bluesmanSF, Champion

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Using "completed" as the identifying date would also not change the situation inspiring this thread.  Also, it might not change too many of the listed dates next to titles.  Keep in mind, too, that the date is used to help distinguish between titles.  That lessens the need for changing the current system of dating. And, dating based on when completed won't help users.  If a film was completed in 2008 but wasn't aired/screen until now will confuse users seeing a 2008.  They will not have likely heard about it until it was appearing and being promoted, which will be closer to the release date. 

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Helmut Tessarek

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You have valid points.
It's just more logical to me to rather use a production date than a release date, because I'm more interested in when the movie was actually made.
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bluesmanSF, Champion

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Many people are interested as well.  I've seen it suggested before a few times.  But, I don't recall having seen those suggestions get a reply as to how those production details might be accurately collected so they can be applied to pages.  It seems it's could only accurately get submitted by the producers...and I don't know if there's really a good reason for them to take the time to do that.  But, if the space is provided, they might type it in if they are making their own submissions, I guess.  Like, a field provided as they update status.
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Helmut Tessarek

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I would assume that the movie studios / production companies have databases of their own. It should not be too complicated to ask them for a list of movies with the production dates. I also could imagine, if IMDB were to send a request like this, they'd be more than happy to honor it.
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trivwhiz

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If you will notice that several of the films have the common word/name of DANTE in the title.  This implies some sort of series, obviously, and it is entirely possible that all of the footage was shot years ago and is being edited and released over a period of a few years.  There is a current example of this going on, where The Hobbit films were/are being filmed over a 3+ year period in New Zealand, and then being released sequentially in three consecutive years.  If someone who is in all three films, but finished filming his/her role last year, but has since died, and the third film is not due to be released until 2015, that might be listed on that actor's page as (filming) or (post-production) or (completed) but not yet released, even though that person died two or three or more years before the title is released.  Does that make sense to you?
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Helmut Tessarek

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I understand that it makes sense in some of the cases, but I have seen other occasions where it is just totally confusing and not well documented.

But thank you very much for your explanation.
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chuckstreet

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Regarding production dates vs release dates, I have two points:


1) There IS a field in the editor where you can put the actual beginning and ending production dates. I've never seen it displayed on a page, but it's there in the editor and it saves it.  Currently, to view those dates you need to click on Edit.


That's rather silly to have to do that, but maybe these fields are for future use for the way in which you are thinking they should.  The fields are called the beginning and end dates of "filming", but logically "filming" could be taken to mean not the actual footage being shot, but include post-production (editing, foley, soundtrack, re-editing after test showings) and mean the "completed" date.


2) There's an easy way to figure out what the completed date of a film is, without having to contact production companies or filmmakers: the copyright date printed in the film's credits.  That would be at the end of the film, or in the case of some foreign films in the beginning credits.  That date is usually the year the film was completed and ready for release.  The actual first release year is very often the year following the copyright date, though it can be the same year if the copyright was obtained early in the year and the film is released later the same year.