Vortex Wireless 2: Keyswitches on neck

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OK, I bought the Vortex Wireless 2 because it's the closest thing I've found for what I want to do and it's, oh, so close!

Many sound libraries work off of keys switches. If, on a 37-key keyboard, you try to use keys for key switches , you're going to lose a lot of notes. Plus, the octave keys would screw up access to the key switches.

You could use the pads for key switches. This either means removing the right hand from the keys, searching for the right pad, and returning the right hand to the keys OR using the left hand to activate the pads--and the pads are as far from the left hand as one can get. Neither is very practical.

What I would have loved is a set of key switches built on the underside of the neck , where they would be easily accessible to the left hand. In my ideal world, the key switches would look like tiny white-and-black keyboard keys. I'm not sure how many would be needed. One of the sound libraries I own uses one octave's worth (12 keys).

Key switches do not require velocity sensing or after-touch. Velocity would be a cute addition and could be used to turn the 37-key instrument into a 49-key instrument, if key switches weren't needed. In that case and for maximum flexibility, the key switches could be either affected by the octave switches or not (the former if played as an extension of the full-size keyboard, the latter if used as key switches).

I'd trade all the faders and pads on the vortex 2 for key switches on the neck. As it is, I am already scheming to see how I could attach key switches to the neck. :-)
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freixas

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Posted 5 months ago

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Robert

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I did modify my Vortex a few years ago. Take a look at http://practicalusage.com/mp-2-mre-ha...

It can be programmed to do anything. The only drawback is that you have to do it yourself!
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freixas

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Thanks, Robert. I did see your page a while back. At this point, I'm exploring using simple switches (no velocity sensing, no aftertouch). I'm also looking at a full 12 keys, set up in the standard B&W keyboard pattern. No wireless. USB power.

The circuit seems simple. It's more of a mechanical engineering problem than an electrical engineering one. I'm just starting to investigate the possibilities.